Nearer Each Day

Nearer each day to me, dearer each day to me,
this Person inside me is becoming reality.
Saving me, loving me, faith and hope giving me,
You’re all the world to me, Jesus my Lord.

Even when faith is small, when there’s no hope at all,
I hear Him say to me “Trust in Me, and you’ll see
that I’ll supply all your needs if only you will believe.
All anxious doubts will cease while trusting in Me.”

Nearer Each Day

Coffee Blind Test

The sense of taste is duller than we think. We blind-tested coffee from Espresso Fine, Nespresso, Lavazza, Supremo, and the Coffee Bean. We were all shocked that it was way more difficult than we’d expected and nobody could tell Supremo which is the cheapest. So my conclusion is this. If you want better taste of coffee, use a better cup.

Coffee Blind Test

[Scrap] Howard Schultz – Good C.E.O.’s Are Insecure (and Know It)

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/10/business/10corner.html?pagewanted=1&_r=2&ref=business

Turning a culture around is very difficult to do because it’s based on a series of many, many decisions, and the organization is framed by those decisions. Here’s one example: In the late-’80s, before we went public in ’92, Starbucks gave comprehensive health insurance to part-time workers and equity in the form of stock options to part-time people. That created an unbelievable connection, and we still do it. … I also think that I was insecure about being a poor kid, but with that came a sense of values and sensitivity about those people who didn’t get respect and had low self-esteem because of that. So in the early days of Starbucks, my office was in the roasting plant. And I ended every day by walking the plant floor and thanking people who were the unsung heroes of the company. For many people, that demonstrated that I wasn’t sitting in some ivory tower. I was one of them. And I think the leadership style I have is that I’ve never put myself above anyone else, and I’ve never asked more of anyone than I was willing to do myself.

(How do you hire?) I want big thinkers. I want people who are going to be entrepreneurial. I want people who are going to have important things to say and the courage to say them. I want people to challenge the status quo, but I also say something to everyone I hire, and that is: “You don’t have to come in here and try to hit a home run, and let me tell you why. You’re coming in here because I and many others believe very strongly in who you are and what you can bring to the company. So you don’t have to come in here and prove something right away.” People who succeed at Starbucks are going to demonstrate a healthy level of respect and understanding of the culture of the company and the people who have come before them. There have been great people who have come into the company who haven’t succeeded because they have not embraced the culture and values of the company, so you need to do that.

I think one of my strengths is that I have a very good antenna about people. I’ll ask a few things that are probably different from a traditional interview. First off, I want to know what you’re reading and then I’ll ask you why. Tell me what work-life balance means to you. I would want to know specifically their level of understanding about our company and Starbucks culture, and I’ll see early on who’s faking it and who’s not. I obviously want people who enjoy coffee. I think it would be very difficult for me to hire somebody who doesn’t drink coffee. I want happy people. I want people who enjoy other people. And we’ll talk about what it’s going to take to win and I’ll ask people to describe that for me.

I think it’s so difficult to succeed today in business. The ability for the team to function together, to support one another, to trust one another, to have cohesion and to also have creative tension, is just mission-critical. If you came in to our weekly Monday-afternoon meeting, you would think, “Man, this company’s in trouble.” Because we are incredibly self-critical, and that’s an attribute I have because I know there are always areas of improvement. But we also have to find opportunities to celebrate success, and I want to find opportunities for the people in the company to find those moments where people are doing things really well and recognize them and support them and celebrate them, especially in this kind of environment.

If you don’t love what you’re doing with unbridled passion and enthusiasm, you’re not going to succeed when you hit obstacles. I want to see emotion. We are in an emotional business, and I need people around me who understand that we are an emotional business and have a visceral affection for it.

I would say one of the underlying strengths of a great leader and a great C.E.O. — not all the time but when appropriate — is to demonstrate vulnerability, because that will bring people closer to you and show people the human side of you. Now, in order to demonstrate vulnerability, you have to make sure you have people around you who will never use that against you, because you trust them and they trust you. So the ability, behind closed doors, to have open and honest conversations with your team about the concerns you have, the fears you have, and the opportunities, is the balance that someone needs to succeed.

[Scrap] Howard Schultz – Good C.E.O.’s Are Insecure (and Know It)

Running

난 육체적으로 힘든 일을 하다가 (팔굽혀펴기라든지 달리기라든지) 너무 힘들어서 그만할까 생각이 들면 종종 “이것도 못하면 연구는 할 수 있겠어?”라는 우스운 생각을 하곤 한다. 그러면서 이렇게 말도 안 되는 상관관계를 만들어내는 내 모습에 스스로도 어이가 없어서 “참나 이거 못한다고 연구랑 뭔 상관이야” 하는데 결국엔 계획한 만큼을 다 채우게 된다. 오늘도 캠퍼스를 달리다가 너무 힘들어서 좀 걸어갈까 고민하다 이게 떠올랐다. 그러고는 역시나 이런 우스운 협박을 만들어낸 스스로를 비웃고는 정신을 차려보니 골지점에 도착해 있었다.

Running