[Scrap] What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades

Source: The New York Times (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/03/science/whats-lost-as-handwriting-fades.html?_r=2)

A good reason to draw letters when memorizing English words? Seeing is not enough:

In another study, Dr. James is comparing children who physically form letters with those who only watch others doing it. Her observations suggest that it is only the actual effort that engages the brain’s motor pathways and delivers the learning benefits of handwriting.

Handwriting is important (compared with writing on computers):

A 2012 study led by Karin James, a psychologist at Indiana University, lent support to that view.
Children who had not yet learned to read and write were presented with a letter or a shape on an index card and asked to reproduce it in one of three ways: trace the image on a page with a dotted outline, draw it on a blank white sheet, or type it on a computer. They were then placed in a brain scanner and shown the image again.

The researchers found that the initial duplication process mattered a great deal. When children had drawn a letter freehand, they exhibited increased activity in three areas of the brain that are activated in adults when they read and write: the left fusiform gyrus, the inferior frontal gyrus and the posterior parietal cortex.

By contrast, children who typed or traced the letter or shape showed no such effect. The activation was significantly weaker.

[Scrap] What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades

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